39. LISINGS OF MAGALANG

Standing L-R; Virgilio Lising Lacson, Marina del Rosario Lacson (Virgilio's wife), Justina Lacson Sazon, (Virgilio's niece) and Ernesto Aragon (Justina's husband). Sitting L-R; Romana Lising de Lacson, Emilia P. Lising and Antonina Lising Vda de Luciano. Sitting in front: Roy del Rosario Lacson
The Lisings of Magalang traced their ancestry to the couple, Don Isaac Liwanag Lising, teniente mayor (vice mayor) of Magalang and Doña Apolonia Pineda. Their children are; Hilaria, Clotilde, Marcelo, Emilia, Adela, Antonina, Romana, and Florentino. Hilaria married Dr. Filomeno Sanchez and they had son, Raymundo married Lucila Andres Dayrit, daughter of Don Ladislao Canlas Dayrit and Doña Maria Andres of barrio Sta Cruz. 

Raymundo Lising Sanchez (standing) and Lucila A. Dayrit (sitting)
Clotilde married Victor Calaguas Dayrit, son of Don Valentin Lansang Dayrit, gobernadorcillo of Magalang in 1869-1871 and his wife, Doña Placida Calaguas of barrio San Francisco. Marcelo married Engracia Ocampo Lacson, daughter of Don Anacleto Suarez Lacson, gobernadorcillo of Magalang in 1871-1873 and his wife, Doña Luisa Quiazon de Ocampo. The couple had one daughter, Eugenia (known as Apung Sening) later married Francisco Manalo of Bacolor, Pampanga. 

Victor Calaguas Dayrit (standing) Clotilde Lising (sitting on left) and Antonina P. Lising (sitting below)
Picture taken on Victor and Clotilde's wedding day. Antonina stood as bridesmaid. 
Adela married schoolteacher, Estanislao Mañago of Mexico, Pampanga and they had two daughters, Lilia Francisca married Tito Villavicencio and Josefina. Romana married Fidel Ocampo Lacson (youngest brother of Engracia, and making the couples as brothers and sisters-in-laws as well!) and their children are, Nicasio married Natividad Roa Estagle of San Jose City, Nueva Ecija, Virgilio married Marina Castro del Rosario, a schoolteacher from Angeles, Alberto married Angelita Aguas of San Fernando, and Fernando. Florentino, a schoolteacher of Magalang Elementary School married his fellow schoolteacher, Filomena Chatengco of Porac, Pampanga and their daughter, Amelia married Daniel Tayag Lacson, the longest serving mayor of Magalang (1968-1986). Antonina married Dr. Andres J. Luciano on their old age; and Emilia remained single for the rest of her life.

Photo Credits:

Picture of Romana, Emilia and Antonina Lising, courtesy of the late Mr. Eduardo J.E. Lacson

Wedding of Raymundo Sanchez and Lucila Dayrit, courtesy of Dr. Ignacio P. Morales

Wedding picture of Victor Dayrit and Clotilde Dayrit, courtesy of Angeles University Foundation, Institute of Kapampangan Studies.

Source:

Bartolo, Louie Aldrin L. and Dizon, Lino L., The Magalang Book: The Historical Life and Culture of a Kapampangan Town (1605-2015), Manila (2016), National Commission for Culture and the Arts, page 108. 




















38. UNFORGETTABLE NATURAL DISASTERS IN MAGALANG



Natural disasters are made by the nature. It us unpredictable during older times. And when it comes, it will destroy properties and perish many lives. In Magalang, there are some unforgettable natural disasters that struck the town and changed its history. 

1858- torrential rains poured all over Luzon. A report signed on November 11 on the same year by the gobernadorcillo that time, Don Salvador Manalo that due to heavy rains, Parua River was overflowed and destroyed everything. All of the bridges crossing the river are destroyed, canals are also destroyed and roads are not accessible. At the same time, the comandante of Comandancia Militar de Tarlac that time, Don Sebastian Hernandez reported that Magalang was like of a huge lake due to floods. 

1863- on June 3, a strong earthquake struck the town and left considerable damage. Torrential rains poured again on Magalang and flooded the town once again. This huge disaster prompted Governor General Rafael Echague Birmingham to issue expediente dated December 3 on the same year. The expediente ordered the transfer of Magalang from barrio San Bartolome to high elevated place of Talimunduc, located in barrio San Pedro. It also stated in the expediente the creation of new town of Concepcion; composed of former barrios of Magalang located on north bank of Parua River. The actual transfer was done in December 13 according to the report penned by Fr. Ignacio Manzanares, OSA, cura parocco of Magalang. While the new town of Concepcion was established in barrio Matondo and later it was transfer once again in the present site. 

1867- a strong storm struck Central Luzon. Some provinces in Pampanga including Magalang was flooded. The roads linking to the town of Sta Ana are not passable. 

1936- a powerful storm pounded Central Luzon including Magalang; leaving ten dead when their boat was capsized. Other scattered deaths are reported. 

1972- tropical depression Didang pounded Central Luzon; leaving Pampanga including Magalang flooded. On the same year, a month long torrential rains poured all over Luzon due to circulation of southwest monsoon by the super typhoon Gloring. This unstoppable rains locally known as siyam-siyam flooded all over Luzon. This natural disaster known as the 1972 Luzon Great Flood

1991- Mt. Pinatubo erupted and its ashes were mixed with strong rains brought by the strong typhoon Diding. This mixture of ash and rainwater known as lahar flowed in major rivers and tributaries in Pampanga, Tarlac and Zambales destroyed houses and properties. Lahar flowed into Parua River and destroyed houses in Concepcion. The lahar flows slightly flowed into barrio San Roque and Navaling in Magalang. Slight damages were reported.    

1995- tropical storm Mameng crossed Central Luzon leaving whole Pampanga flooded. The town proper of Magalang was also flooded due to overflowing of streams. It was reported that a small dam was destroyed and huge waters further flooded Magalang. 

Photo Credit: 

http://www.weatherexplained.com/images/walm_01_img0157.jpg

Source:

Bartolo, Louie Aldrin L. and Dizon, Lino L., The Magalang Book: The Historical Life and Culture of a Kapampangan Town (1605-2015), Manila (2016), National Commission for Culture and the Arts, pages 28, 29, 30, 60, 78 and 80.